Emergency Room Mistakes

Doctors, nurses and medical staff take pride in the standard of care in our hospitals. But the failure to exercise a degree of reasonable care in Emergency Rooms happens more often than you might think.

The attorneys of Green Haines Sgambati understand that rapid and specific treatment is essential for a patient in a hospital Emergency Room.

But inappropriate action ruins thousands of lives every year, and in some cases, results in death.  The high volume of patients (often in critical condition) and chronic staff shortages create an environment in the hospital ER that is ripe for errors.

A recent study of more than 30,000 randomly selected hospital records found that hospital Emergency Departments have a higher proportion of adverse events due to negligence than any other area of the hospital.  Most common were diagnostic errors or mishaps in treatment, largely due to part-time, inexperienced physicians and staff.

In the ER, time is of the essence; rapid and specific treatment is essential to a patient’s recovery.  Depending on the condition, an Emergency Room physician may be required to refer the patient immediately to a specialist.  Some conditions that result in long-term pain, disability or death could have been prevented by prompt and competent action by the ER staff and doctors.

The most common type of Emergency Room errors include:

• Failure to fully evaluate or treat a patient’s condition
• Late or wrong diagnosis
• Faulty laboratory tests
• Contaminated blood transfusions
• Prescribing wrong medication
• Failure to monitor a patient

If you received the wrong diagnosis or were injured due to the negligence of Emergency Room doctors, nurses or staff — you may have a medical malpractice claim.  You could be eligible to receive compensation for the damages caused to your family.

The attorneys Green Haines Sgambati are experienced and successful medical malpractice litigators.  For a free consultation call today.

by Atty. Richard Abrams

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